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Book Methods of Quantum Field Theory in Statistical Physics (Dover Books on Physics) [Paperback] [1975] (Author) A. A. Abrikosov

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Methods of Quantum Field Theory in Statistical Physics (Dover Books on Physics) [Paperback] [1975] (Author) A. A. Abrikosov

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  • Dover Publications (1975)
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  • Science & Math

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Review Text

  • By Adam S on February 4, 2006

    This is a serious book with a seriously long title and three seriously hard-to-pronounce author-names.Of course, as the other reviewers have already stated, this book is a Classic. It is also, as one other reviewer has proclaimed, not a book from which I would like to learn quantum field theory."Methods of Quantum Field Theory in Statistical Physics" by A.A. Abrikosov, L. P. gorkox, and I.E. Dzyaloshinski (or "AGD" as it is known) is thought of by many as the be all and end all of field theory texts in the condensed matter physics world.But, AGD should not be thought of as a book that introduces the reader to field theory. You definitely must have studied field theory (either relativistic or non-relativistic) from an introductory book that uses the canonical formalism before attempting to get anything out of AGD.For example, if you are not already familiar with Wick's Theorem and how to prove it, then you will get very little out of AGD's single paragraph of text which "proves" the thoerem. On the other hand, if you already know of Wick's theorem you may find the proof in AGD rather cute. As for me, when I read the one paragraph of text that AGD put forward as a "proof" of Wick's Theorem, I immediately puked in my own mouth.Yummy.Another downside to AGD is the fact that they do not even mention the path integral formalism. Everything is done in the canonical formalism, as you might expect from a bunch of old school Russians.Finally, I will repeat that this book IS a Classic, and there is a ton of great stuff in this book. If you are a serious student of condensed matter physics then you must have this book. If, on the other hand, you are trying to learn field theory for the first time, then go buy "Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell" by Zee.

  • By Osiris.Xu on December 27, 2010

    This book is a must have if you're interested with applications of QFT in condensed matter physics. It's well organized.Other useful books you may consider:"Methods of Quantum Field Theory in Statistical Physics" by A.A. Abrikosov, L. P. gorkox, and I.E. Dzyaloshinski (or "AGD" as it is known) is thought of by many as the be all and end all of field theory texts in the condensed matter physics world.Alexander L. Fetter, John Dirk Walecka, Quantum theory of many-particle systemsNegele and Orland, Quantum Many-particle SystemsAlexander Altland, Ben D. Simons, Condensed Matter Field TheoryJauho and Haug, Quantum Kinetics in Transport and Optics of Semiconductorsenjoy!

  • By Locust on August 4, 2004

    This book is little or no use unless you have a very strong background infield theoretical methods. If you are a seasoned pro. you might find ituseful but if you want to teach yourself.... you will soon get frustrated.Still my hat's off to the authors who pioneered the area.Conclusion: if you are a PhD student, get Fetter & Walecka instead.

  • By A customer on February 8, 2001

    This is a classic, and quite possibly it doesn't get any better than this to teach you the technique. For those used to a textbook style, this will be a bit of an unpleasant surprise, because writing is somewhat condensed, but that's quite typical for the old Russian school of theoretical physics. However, all the important issues are properly stressed, all derivations are rigorous, and what is most important, the physical reasoning is clear an to the point.

  • By A customer on May 23, 2000

    This book is a classic in the subject of quantum many-body theory.Written in the sixties by the Russuian school,it gives extremely succinct but potent account of the the subject.The whole book is guided with the spirit of Landau's Fermi liquid theory.

  • By A customer on May 23, 2000

    This book is a classic in the subject of quantum many-body theory.Written in the sixties by the Russuian school,it gives extremely succinct but potent account of the the subject.The whole book is guided with the spirit of Landau's Fermi liquid theory.

  • By chicken head cut off on May 18, 2015

    In typical Russian style this is written in a dense style. There is an introductory chapter which is quite challenging meant, I believe, as an overall discussion laying groundwork for the rest of the book. It can mostly be skipped or skimmer. Then the first few chapters after the first show how to do calculations in absolute gorey detail. This is a really good place for students to invest their time. They do real and k-space Feynman diagrams to higher orders so the reader gets used to the technique. Once the techniques are established the book goes on to examine bose Fermi and superconducting systems. these again, are dense chapters, but 'everything is in there. I basically consider this book to be part of the landau-lifshitz series.Part of it (chapters 2-?4?) are appropriate for a graduate class if you know: stat mech, quantum, basic solids, & have patience. Easier books are Bruus and Flensberg (not too much in way of bosons), Rickayzen... Fetter and Walecka are like a longer version of this but they save a lot for the problems and that text is more formal results....The book is called "the green monster" in Russia (it has a green cover in those editions). The name is appropriate. Rereading AGD (the US name for the same book) is something many professional physicists do.

  • By vivishek on August 5, 2012

    Abrikosov's exceptionally clear presentation of field theoretic methods is one of the best (and at time, original) sources to learn from. From the perspective of the time when it was written, it is complete and comprehensive, and following in the footsteps of the Russian theoretical school, the reader will need some amount of focus to follow the mathematical line of reasoning. The serious student will nevertheless have to supplement this book with a more modern follow-up - not Fetter/Walecka though, as Abrikosov deals with the formalism much better than F/W.


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