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Grails in Action

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Grails in Action.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Glen Smith(Author)

    Book details


Summary

Grails in Action, Second Edition is a comprehensive introduction to Grails 2 focused on making you super-productive fast. In this totally revised new edition, you'll master Grails 2.3 core skills as you apply TDD techniques to developing a full-scale Twitter clone. Along the way you'll learn the latest single-page web app UI techniques, work with NoSQL backends, integrate with enterprise messaging, and implement a complete RESTful API for your services.

Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications.

About the Technology

It may be time for you to stop reconfiguring, rewriting, and recompiling your Java web apps. Grails, a Groovy-powered web framework, hides all that busy work so you can concentrate on what your applications do, not how they're built. In addition to its famously intuitive dev environment and seamless integration with Spring and Hibernate, the new Grails 2.3 adds improved REST support, better protection against attacks from the web, and better dependency resolution.

About the Book

Grails in Action, Second Edition is a comprehensive introduction to Grails 2. In this totally revised edition you'll master Grails as you apply TDD techniques to a full-scale example (a Twitter clone). Along the way you'll learn single-page web app techniques, work with NoSQL back ends, integrate with enterprise messaging, implement a RESTful API ... and more.

No Java or Groovy knowledge is required. Some web development and OOP experience is helpful.

What's Inside

  • Covers Grails 2.3 from the ground up
  • Agile delivery and testing using Spock
  • How to use and manage plugins
  • Tips and tricks from the trenches

About the Authors

There's no substitute for experience: Glen Smith and Peter Ledbrook have been fixtures in the Grails community, contributing code, blogging, and speaking at conferences worldwide, since Grails 0.2.

Table of Contents

    PART 1 INTRODUCING GRAILS
  1. Grails in a hurry
  2. The Groovy essentials
  3. PART 2 CORE GRAILS
  4. Modeling the domain 63
  5. Creating the initial UI
  6. Retrieving the data you need
  7. Controlling application flow
  8. Services and data binding
  9. Developing tasty forms, views, and layouts
  10. PART 3 EVERYDAY GRAILS
  11. Building reliable applications
  12. Using plugins: just add water
  13. Protecting your application
  14. Exposing your app to other programs
  15. Single-page web applications (and other UI stuff)
  16. Understanding Spring and transactions
  17. PART 4 ADVANCED GRAILS
  18. Understanding events, messaging, and scheduling
  19. NoSQL and Grails
  20. Beyond compile, test, run
  21. Grails in the cloud
  22. BONUS ONLINE CHAPTERS
  23. Advanced GORM kung fu
  24. Developing plugins

2.5 (11221)
  • Pdf

*An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose.

Formats for this Ebook

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch.
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes

Book details

  • PDF | 576 pages
  • Glen Smith(Author)
  • Manning Publications; 2 edition (July 24, 2014)
  • English
  • 3
  • Computers & Technology

Read online or download a free book: Grails in Action

 

Review Text

  • By A. Zubarev on August 17, 2014

    So yes, Grails has been inspired by Rails, but even without me knowing much Rails it is evident that Grails is a super feature reach, extensible web framework that utilizes verified, well known components as Spring, Hibernate/GORM, Quartz, Active MQ and more which makes it stands out like on the shoulders of a giant. A very flexible, convention over configuration (makes a lot of heavy-lifting behind the scenes) system.The book itself is another shiny star: the author and publisher did a very good work in releasing a very thorough material. It is written the way I like it - by submerging a reader into deep waters - by jumping right into creating a working web application!Besides, I read not long time ago on another RAD tool - Flask. I was therefore able to look at Grails from the retrospective of a user of another web framework: what stood out is the absence of configs in Grails, or the extensive need to tackle them, and no numerous pip installs as in Flask. The impression I am under after reading this book, Grails is a super productive framework. And indeed, it works well with any databases (RDBMS' and NoSQL, even Graph databases) and seamlessly integrates with Java libraries.The book aims high, too - to make the reader not less than a Grails productive developer.Kudos to Peter and Glen! Who are advocates of Grails/Groovy, and successfully sell the Framework. Yet the authors have a unique talent of explaining things in simple words, e.g. closures, dynamic programming were explained elegantly.More on Grails and what is done well in the book: Ajax support is dynamically built-in, nice! Grails has a very strong, mature IoC implementation (I am impressed) Operating in the Cloud is well enough covered (a big bonus nowadays) The book covers the text search options using Searchable that may become Elasticsearch; Also covers RESTful services and how to expose API in your app to make it consumable from outside The book makes a quick stop (I advocate there should had been more coverage) on Single Page Apps with Angular.js There is a special emphasis done on protecting your application from malicious use or such common exploitations as SQL Injection; Performance tuning, legacy integration, database transactions, custom build processes, and even how to develop and publish your own pluginsI liked chapter 4 on building a UI, Ch 13 on RESTFUL services, and the Scheduling in Part 15 then 16 on NoSQL the most.If you ask me if I had any bad experience that would be the what I feel an excessive amount of time dedicated to testing code and various techniques to doing so, hey but it is really necessary.

  • By Francesco Bianchi on October 10, 2014

    Grails in Action is definitely a book I wish I had read before starting to work on Grails.Well written, easy and funny to read, it makes the process of learning Grails a pleasant journey. Theory is perfectly balanced with examples of code. When you finish the book you get the feeling that you really learned something useful that it will be a pleasure to use in your daily work.I read this book after having worked with Grails for 1 year I cannot tell if it's a good reading for newbies but it seemed to me all the concepts were explained in a very simple way, easily accessible also by programmers with little knowledge of programming in general. At the same time I found the book to be a good source of good insights that made me appreciate more and understand more deeply features of the framework that I was already using. Occasionally I've also found tricks that I think I will use in my daily work with Grails.One thing that I particularly appreciated about the book was the focus it puts on continuously testing the code. This is exactly the way applications should be developed with Grails and the author made it evident how easy it is to accomplish a task often seen as too painful and time-consuming.The chapters I appreciated the most were the ones related to the presentation layers. A plus for me (but this is subjective) is that the author decided to use AngularJS as a web development framework as a modern alternative to put the code in GSPs. The code was simple for me because I have used AngularJS in conjunction with Grails (and enjoyed the process) previously but I think that here too the author was able to find a very good balance in the information given, something particularly difficult when you need to introduce a new technology to show features of another one you are currently focusing on.Recently I have also had the chance to read excerpts of the previous version of the book and I think this new version greatly improves the previous one exploring new features of the framework and focusing more on testing the code. So, if you have a copy of the older one, you should still consider to buy this update.Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  • By J. Horst on May 30, 2015

    Not quite as easy to follow as I expected. It seemed some detail was left out of the many examples, and while I could have (and did) make the effort to figure them out, I still felt the material was incomplete. YMMV.

  • By Victor M. Perez on September 18, 2014

    This is a very good book for learning Grails fast. It's not perfect, but it's very good.Right from the start, at the preface, the book surprised me for its fresh approach and the direct language. Everything is explained in a way that is easy to understand. It transmits passion, enthusiasm about Grails. Contragutulations to the authors, you made a great book!It's much easier and entertaining to read this book than the online documentation, for example, at grails.org.As an experienced programmer, I reckon it might be worth it investing time in learning Groovy. Groovy looks like Java, but it's not Java, it's Groovy. I liked a lot the Spock test framework. It gave me some ideas for using in my Java day to day usage. Not to mention Spring integration... You really get useful things from this book.I agree with some opinion here that the installation description could be more detailed, and add some troubleshooting, just in case you have some problems like I did.My installation was based on latest (Aug'14) Grails version, v2.4.3 (the book is based on v2.3.7), and Java 1.8. I found I was better off typing the code myself from scratch than using the provided samples. For this you have to really keep track of the book because it's not always clear which file you need to modify, or where to create that other file...Running the apps I got into some errors which Grails advice you how to solve. This was not that difficult, and it was probably due to my configuration, but i missed something about this in the book.


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