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Crimson

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Crimson.pdf | Language: UNKNOWN
    Gordo. Rollo(Author)

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Four engaging boys from Dunville, Ontario, dub their 1977 club The Knights of the Round Room after finding a bomb shelter on Johnny Page's farm. In 1955 Jacob Harrison killed his family and hanged himself on that same spot, and Johnny's tumble into a well awakens a creature who has possessed what's left of Harrison's corpse. It confronts the boys and tempts one of them into evil. By 1986, the boys are 19 and the creature is rampaging again, framing Johnny's friend Peter for the Ripper Killer's 12-victim crime spree.

Four engaging boys from Dunville, Ontario, dub their 1977 club The Knights of the Round Room after finding a bomb shelter on Johnny Page's farm. In 1955 Jacob Harrison killed his family and hanged himself on that same spot, and Johnny's tumble into a well awakens a creature who has possessed what's left of Harrison's corpse. It confronts the boys and tempts one of them into evil. By 1986, the boys are 19 and the creature is rampaging again, framing Johnny's friend Peter for the Ripper Killer's 12-victim crime spree.

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Book details

  • PDF | Unknown pages
  • Gordo. Rollo(Author)
  • Bad Moon Books; First Cloth Edition edition (2009)
  • Unknown
  • 2
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Review Text

  • By Ravenskya on February 28, 2009

    Gord Rollo's Second novel is in my humble oppinion, far superior to his first. Where Jigsaw Man was an interesting new take on the Mad Scientist tale, Crimson is much closer to the "small band of kids take on monster who lives in their small town" tale that so many horror writers eventually touch on. Stephen King's being the most notable IT then we have Dan Simmons with Summer of Night and even fellow Leisure Author Brian Keene with Ghoul.Though Crimson starts out much as all of the others, we quickly take a different turn. The opening scene of this book is a real kick in the gut and will thrill the most avid of gore hounds. From there we travel to about 20 years later. The small farmhouse where our opening scene took place has sat abandoned for all of those years, quietly awaiting new blood to move in. When an unaware single mother and her young son move into the house, there is a stirring in the well out back. Soon four young friends end up playing at the house and discovering an ancient evil trapped away. The four boys fight for their lives as their worst nightmares come to pass.Crimson follows these kids from the time they unleash the monster through their lives as it revisits them, bringing all new terrors with them each time it shows back up.The writing in this book is very strong and the book is extremely interesting. I only had three minor annoyances that I was able to forget and still enjoy the book. The first being that there were too many characters who's name started with "D" I don't know why that bothered me, but for some reason it did. The second was that the characters age significantly from the beginnning of the book through the end, but they never seem to grow mentally to match their ages. And the third was that towards the end of the book there is a large bit of exposition that sort of explained everything that had been going on... I would have preferred for some of it to have been left to the imagination and other bits of it to have been figured out throughout the tale rather than having it all explained at once. Still that was not enough to keep me from really enjoying this read. I recommend it to anyone looking for a good fun scare.Recommended reading ages - 15 and up depending on maturity

  • By Tim Janson on November 19, 2009

    In the 1950's, the small town of Dunnville was shocked by an unspeakable crime. Jacob Harrison, a well-liked man butchered his entire family. Even more disgusting was the revelation that he had cannibalized their remains. Jacob hung himself in an upstairs room but when the police went to remove his body, all that was left was the noose and Harrison's body was never found. Cut ahead some twenty years later and a single mom and her son have moved into the old Harrison home. Johnny soon makes friends with other local boys and when they are searching the Harrison farm to find a spot to build a clubhouse, they uncover an old stairway and an underground room. They release a frightening evil entity that haunts their nights and terrifies them during the day. Is this Jacob Harrison? Or something worse?Crimson calls up comparisons to Stephen King's "It". Like that book, we have a slice of small town life thrown into chaos by pure evil. If anything, Rollo's story is much more visceral than "It" and it's opening prelude is disturbing to say the least. I love these kind of small town horrors because life there can be so claustrophobic that it adds to the terror. And then Rollo starts in with the leeches...I hate leeches, and Crimson is filled with them to the point of nausea. What is also effective about the story is the fact that you don't know what the group of boys is dealing with. Is this really Old Man Harrison, somehow surviving being hung? Or is this the force which drove him to murder and devour his family. The fun is in the discovery!

  • By William M Miller on March 29, 2010

    I absolutely loved Gord Rollo's last book, "The Jigsaw Man", and recommended it to all my friends, but I thought his latest book, "Crimson", was a considerable step down. Granted, those were mighty big shoes to fill since Jigsaw was one of the best books of that year, but had I not known, I never would have guessed this book had the same author.The first third of "Crimson" follows four ten-year-old boys and their accidental awakening of a long-dead creature that had caused a terrible massacre two decades prior. This portion of the book had some great moments that were original and suspenseful. However, once the jump in time occurred and we begin to follow them as teenagers, the atmosphere seemed to dissipate a bit. Scenes started almost immediately with the action and didn't allow for the creepiness to set in. I'm also not a fan of creatures that talk with an attitude. It reminds me too much of Freddy Kruger or the doll Chucky from "Child's Play". It's simply not scary.A couple other issues I had was the glowing red eyes - not red, but actually glowing to the point of illuminating things in the room - like Rudolph's nose from the animated cartoon. Being red or having a dim glow is one thing, but lighting up like a beacon was too much. I also thought the characters, in general, were not very intelligent, making decisions that didn't quite feel right. For instance, when the Police Chief catches a character in a lie that proves his guilt as a serial killer, the Chief doesn't see fit to continue the interrogation or have officers tail him after leaving the police station. I mean, we're talking over a half dozen bodies here and the police knowingly let this guy just walk away. There is also a scene where a rather large fight ensues and at the end, we find out that one of the participants had a cigarette in his mouth. It was never described until the moment the character needed it and I thought that was just too convenient.Finally, the third portion of the book follows the boys (the ones that are left alive) as adults and we spend most of the time in a maximum security prison. These scenes showed nothing we haven't seen before. The big baddies, the jail fights, the token thief, and the friendly 'Green Mile' giant with a heart of gold. The biggest disaster here was the 30 or so pages of explanation as to why the creature has been doing all these evil deeds. It felt as if the author had dug so many holes throughout the book that he was simply, and desperately, trying to fill them back up by this exposition, regardless of how utterly convoluted and far-fetched it may seem, even in this supernatural world.While some might compare "Crimson" as a mix of Stephen King's "It" and Brian Keene's "Ghoul", this is nowhere near either of those fine books. For me, this was one of the biggest disappointments in the last two years of horror, because Gord Rollo's book, "The Jigsaw Man" was so amazing. Apparently "Crimson" was Rollo's first book, even though it was published by Leisure books second. That's a good thing, though, because I'm not sure I would have picked up "The Jigsaw Man" had I read "Crimson" first.


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